Mens Health

Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

This is the inability to get or keep an erection that allows for satisfying sexual activity.

ED is a common condition in men of all ages and ethnicities. The risk of having ED increases with age. The cause of ED can be physical, such as diabetes, nerve damage to the penis or the pelvic area, pelvic surgery, radiation therapy to the pelvic area, low levels of testosterone or neurological disease, like Parkinson’s.

The cause of ED can also be psychological, such as anxiety, depression, feelings of self-inadequacy, low self-esteem, inability to describe emotions or stress.

Diagnosis is made by taking your history, physical examination and usually blood tests.

Treatment of erectile dysfunction is based on the underlying cause and may include medications or other options, such as a penile vacuum device.

Testicular cancer

The usual symptom is a painless, hard lump in the testicle. It may however be associated with pain. Generally there are no urinary symptoms or fever. The lump often comes on slowly and will be discovered by accident, perhaps in the shower.

Diagnosis is made by taking your history, physical examination, blood tests and ultrasound scan of the scrotum. Treatment is almost always necessary and should be done as soon as possible.

Treatment usually involves surgery to remove the testicle +/- chemotherapy and radiotherapy. If you or your doctor ever discover a new lump in the testicle, you should always have it investigated further.

Testicular pain or orchitis

The classic symptom is a painful testicle. Other symptoms may include swelling, fever or urinary symptoms. Causes can include urinary or sexual infection. Orchitis can also occur in the absence of bacterial infection. For example it can be caused by a virus, like mumps.

Diagnosis is made by taking your history, physical examination, urine tests and ultrasound scan of the scrotum. Treatment usually includes antibiotics.

Scrotal swellings

Hydrocoele

This is a collection of fluid around the testicle. It is usually a painless swelling and comes on slowly. Diagnosis is made by taking your history, physical examination and ultrasound scan of the scrotum. Treatment is indicated if it becomes very large and cumbersome, and/or painful.

Treatment is either surgery under general anaesthetic to drain the fluid, or drainage of the fluid under local anaesthetic in the office, with the subsequent injection of alcohol into the scrotum to prevent recurrence of the fluid build up.

 

Spermatocoele (Epididymal cyst)

This is a fluid filled cyst sitting above the testicle. It may feel like a third testicle.

Diagnosis is made by taking your history, physical examination and ultrasound scan of the scrotum. Treatment is indicated if it becomes very large and cumbersome, and/or painful.

Treatment is either surgery under general anaesthetic to drain the fluid, or drainage of the fluid under local anaesthetic in the office, with the subsequent injection of alcohol into the scrotum to prevent recurrence of the fluid build up.

Varicocoele

This is equivalent to a varicose vein in the scrotum. The classic symptom is an ache or pain in the scrotum, often made worse by periods of standing. Find out more about Varicocoele.

BACK TO VARICOCOELE

Inguinal scrotal hernia

This is a hernia that extends down into the scrotum from the abdomen. It may be painful or painless. It may come on slowly or suddenly. It may be made worse by straining or heavy lifting.

Diagnosis is made by taking your history, physical examination and ultrasound scan of the scrotum. Treatment is often conservative, if the symptoms are mild. If more severe, you may require surgery under general anaesthetic to repair the hernia. This is done by a general surgeon.

If you ever have very severe and persistent pain from an inguinal scrotal hernia, this may be a medical emergency and you should be seen by a doctor as soon as possible.